College of Fine Arts News Archive

October 2015

  • Stone Fort Wind Quintet to perform audience favorites

    Stone Fort Wind Quintet to perform audience favorites

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    SFA’s Stone Fort Wind Quintet will perform at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 10, in Cole Concert Hall on the SFA campus.

    October 30, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    An assortment of quartets and duos will be featured in the upcoming concert of the Stone Fort Wind Quintet at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 10, in Cole Concert Hall on the Stephen F. Austin State University campus.

    The quintet is made up of SFA School of Music faculty members Christina Guenther, flute; John W. Goodall, oboe; Christopher Ayer, clarinet; Staci Spring, bassoon; and Charles Gavin, horn.

    This faculty recital will open with “A Comical Overture” by the Austrian composer Ernst Spies. The piece “pokes fun at the melodramatic concert overture by emphasizing the cliché musical devices that are often employed in 19th century dramatic music,” according to Ayer.

    Guenther and Ayer will perform Duos for Flute and Clarinet by the American composer Robert Muczynski. A composer who was in demand for his film and television scores, Muczynski’s music has been perennially popular for its accessibility to audiences.

    “The Duos are full of familiar rhythmic vitality, a hallmark of his music,” Ayer said.

    The program also includes Gioachino Rossini’s Quartet in B-flat, which is “full of the tongue-in-cheek Rossini style and is fun for the performers and audience alike,” Ayer said.

    The concert will close with “The New-Found Journal” by San Antonio native Kerry Turner, an award-winning composer who has written many exceptional compositions for winds and performs with the Luxembourg Philharmonic.

    “‘The New-Found Journal’ is a musical depiction of someone discovering an old, leather bound journal from a previous era and the excitement that goes along with reading first-person accounts as a window into another time,” Ayer said.

    Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and $3 for students and youth. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

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  • SFA’s Trombone Choir to perform works by Gabrieli, Mendelssohn

    SFA’s Trombone Choir to perform works by Gabrieli, Mendelssohn

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    October 30, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The Trombone Choir at Stephen F. Austin State University will perform a recital at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 12, in Cole Concert Hall in the Wright Music Building on the SFA campus.

    Directed by Dr. Deb Scott, professor of trombone, the 22-member choir will perform “Canzona XIII,” composed by Giovanni Gabrieli in the 16th century for St. Mark’s Cathedral in Venice.

    “This piece will feature three choirs of all trombones, including the contra bass trombone, which plays in the range of the tuba,” Scott said.

    Two other sacred pieces that Scott described as “beautiful chorales” are on the program, including “Ave Maria” by Anton Bruckner and arranged by Douglas Yeo, and “Holy is God the Lord” by Felix Mendelssohn.

    The concert will also feature a piece by Dmitri Kabalevsky.

    “Overture to ‘Colas Breugnon’ is a lively fun piece composed originally for an opera orchestra by Kabalevsky and arranged for trombone choir by Gary Slechta,” Scott said.

    The recital a joint presentation of the College of Fine Arts and School of Music and is part of the Cole Performing Arts Series.

    Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and $3 for students and youth. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

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  • Third annual Día de los Muertos Fiesta expected to draw large crowds

    Third annual Día de los Muertos Fiesta expected to draw large crowds

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    Face painting is a popular activity each year at the Día de los Muertos Fiesta, which is slated this year for 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7, at The Cole Art Center @ The Old Opera House in downtown Nacogdoches.
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    The Chikawa Aztec Dancers will return to Nacogdoches for the third annual Día de los Muertos Fiesta Saturday night, Nov. 7, in downtown Nacogdoches.
    October 28, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The Chikawa Aztec Dancers will return to Nacogdoches for the third annual Día de los Muertos Fiesta set for 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7, at The Cole Art Center @ The Old Opera House in downtown Nacogdoches.

    Día de los Muertos, or the Day of the Dead observance, is considered a cheerful celebration of life, honoring the souls of the deceased. Día de los Muertos is a Mexican term derived from the Roman Catholic All Saints’ and All Souls’ days, traditionally observed Nov. 1 and 2. An array of activities, ranging from decorating graves to creating home altars, typically highlight the celebration that can last for days.

    For the past two years, hundreds of East Texas residents have attended the Nacogdoches festival, and this year’s event is drawing more entertainment, more booths and greater interest as the festival gains popularity, according to Lisa Steed, events coordinator for Stephen F. Austin State University Art Galleries.

    “We have multiple food booths, including Shelley's Bakery Cafe, Merci's World Cuisine, TacoMex, Friends of the Visual Arts and others,” Steed said. “We have a lot more SFA club participation this year, as well.”

    Among the other featured booths are Nacogdoches High School floral shop, NHS Art Club, SFA Art Alliance, SFA Metals Club, SFA School of Theatre’s face painting, SFA Asian Culture Club, SFA Knights of Columbus, SFA Organization of Latin Americans, Angelina Spanish Club, and more.

    Among the entertainment will be the popular Chikawa Aztec Dancers, Martinez Mariachi Duo, Juan Carlos and Jenna Urena and the SFA Jacks of Steel. Based in Conroe, Chikawa Aztec Dancers with their colorful costumes are always a crowd pleaser, Steed said.

    “We will also have the traditional Day of the Dead procession, and anyone can participate,” she said. “Costumes are highly encouraged, especially Day of the Dead themed costumes.”

    The community altar returns this year in the window of Cole Art Center where remembrances or a photo of a loved one who has passed on can be included. Local artist Carol Eaton Walsh will also have an altar outside in the festival area.

    The SFA School of Theatre will paint sugar skulls as a fundraiser, and there will be a free booth where children of all ages can color a paper mask. A silent art auction inside Cole Art Center will feature donated work by local artists and students. Although some booths charge a fee, the festival is free.

    Fiesta sponsors are Main Street Nacogdoches, Hampton Inn & Suites Nacogdoches, 103 The Bull, R&K Distributing, University Rental, SFA Friends of the Visual Arts and SFA Sound Recording Technology program. The fiesta is organized by SFA Art Galleries.

    The Cole Art Center is located at 329 E. Main St. For more information, call (936) 468-6557.

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  • Double, Double Toil and Trouble: SFA School of Theatre to present ‘Macbeth’

    Double, Double Toil and Trouble: SFA School of Theatre to present ‘Macbeth’

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    October 27, 2015—Shelby Gilliland

    Nearly 410 years after it was written, William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth,” presented by the Stephen F. Austin State University School of Theatre, brings its story to Turner Auditorium in a way that will entertain and educate audiences in a big way.

    Dr. Rick Jones, director of this production and professor in the School of Theatre, says that this is a play “with often beautiful language and psychologically complex characters, and a good story, with intrigue, sensuality, armed combat and a supernatural element,” which is sure to inspire audiences with themes of fate and leadership.

    “Macbeth” is arguably Shakespeare’s most famous tragedy, and it is also a personal favorite of Jones. So, why do this show now?

    Although some students may consider Shakespeare to be boring and out-of-date, this could not be less true for this production, Jones explained. In fact, this play could almost never be more applicable than now.

    “This is a play about political machination as we head into primary season for the next presidential election,” Jones said. “It’s a play that speaks to the belief that we all have from time to time – that we’re not really in control of our own fates.”

    That is a belief with which many students can sympathize. This production will also be an educational opportunity, as “Macbeth” holds some important historical significance that many may not recognize, Jones explained.

    “It’s one of the most significant of Shakespeare’s plays in historical terms because it so clearly demonstrates Shakespeare’s transition from plays designed to appeal to Queen Elizabeth to those designed to appeal to King James,” he said.

    This production of “Macbeth” employs a two-world concept, where the witch characters exist in a modern 21st century world, manipulating the events of the play, while the mortal characters exist in a pre-Norman Britain, which is the time of the real historical Macbeth, several hundred years before Shakespeare’s time, according to Jones.

    This production is a true collaboration between SFA School of Theatre faculty and students, featuring faculty designers Tara Houston (scenery), CC Conn (sound), Angela Bacarisse (costumes), and faculty fight choreographer Slade Billew, along with student designers Troy Carrico (lights), Kate Shirley (choreographer), Shelby Gilliland (dramaturg) and Taylor Dobbs (properties).

    The School of Theatre will present “Macbeth” at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, Nov. 17 through 21, as well as a matinee performance at 10 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 19, in W.M. Turner Auditorium on the SFA campus. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for seniors and $7.50 for students. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.theatre.sfasu.edu.

    The Mainstage Series is sponsored in part by Tipton Ford Lincoln.

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  • Madrigal Singers to perform music of Janequin, Rutter

    Madrigal Singers to perform music of Janequin, Rutter

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    October 26, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The Stephen F. Austin State University College of Fine Arts and School of Music will present the Madrigal Singers in concert at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 5, in Cole Concert Hall.

    The Madrigal Singers is a chamber group comprised of upper lever vocal music majors at SFA. The group is well known in the Nacogdoches area, particularly for many caroling concerts at Christmastime, according to Dr. Tim King, director of choral activities for the SFA School of Music.

    Among the works on the program is “Le Chant des Oyseaux” (Song of the Birds) by the 16th century French composer Clément Janequin.

    “This is from a unique category of songs called program chansons (French for songs),” King explained. “The driving force behind the program chanson was to depict actual life sounds, such as the sounds of war or street sounds. In this, arguably the most famous chanson, Janequin recalls the various bird calls.”

    The Madrigal Singers will also perform “Birthday Madrigals” by modern English composer John Rutter.

    “Rutter wrote a set of vocal jazz pieces entitled ‘Birthday Madrigals,’ which were based on texts by Shakespeare,” King said. “This set of songs was written to honor the great jazz pianist George Shearing.”

    Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and $3 for students and youth. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

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  • SFA film series to screen ‘Greenwich Village: Music That Defined A Generation’

    SFA film series to screen ‘Greenwich Village: Music That Defined A Generation’

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    October 26, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The Stephen F. Austin State University School of Art and the Friends of the Visual Arts will present a free, one-night screening of “Greenwich Village: Music That Defined A Generation” at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 6, in The Cole Art Center @ The Old Opera House in downtown Nacogdoches.

    “Greenwich Village: Music That Defined A Generation,” directed by Laura Archibald, is a feature-length documentary about the Greenwich Village music scene and how it sparked everlasting political, social and cultural changes, according to information at greenwichmusicdoc.com.

    For the first time, the greatest singer-songwriters, authors and performers from Greenwich Village reflect on how they collectively became the voice of a generation. Through poignant interviews, rare archival footage and new live performances, “Greenwich Village: Music That Defined A Generation” tells a story about community, courage and most importantly, music, the website said.

    This screening is part of the School of Art’s monthly First Friday Film Series and is sponsored in part by the Nacogdoches Film Festival, William Arscott, The Liberty Bell, Nacogdoches Junior Forum, Karon Gillespie, Mike Mollot, Main Street Nacogdoches, David Kulhavy, John and Kristen Heath, Brad Maule, Galleria Z, Jill Carrington, Jean Stephens and Jim and Mary Neal.

    The Cole Art Center is located at 329 E. Main St. For more information, call (936) 468-1131.

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  • SFA theatre students to present ‘The Boor’

    SFA theatre students to present ‘The Boor’

    October 26, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    Stephen F. Austin State University School of Theatre will present the student-directed “The Boor” at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 6, and at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7, in the Downstage Theatre on the SFA campus.

    Groves junior Caitlin Parker directs Anton Chekhov’s one-act drama about a widow in deep mourning and people around her who pretend to be more than they actually are.

    After Mrs. Popov has been in mourning for seven months, her footman, Luka, advises her to give up her mourning and go out. While Mrs. Popov is denying Luka’s advice, landowner Smirnov arrives, asking her to pay the 1,200 rubles that her husband owed him, Parker explains.

    “She refuses, leading to his rude behavior and an argument that leads to Smirnov proposing a duel,” Parker said. “In the midst of this, however, Smirnov has a change of heart, and, impressed by her boldness and beauty, he professes his love for the widow.”

    The cast includes Groves junior Ashley Mouton as Mrs. Popov; Queens, New York, junior Elham Safi as Luka; and Lufkin sophomore Jacob Carr as Smirnov.

    The production staff includes William Odom, Brownsboro junior, stage manager; Andy Bauerle, Conroe junior, scenic designer; Cloey Hammonds, Nacogdoches junior, costume designer; Brian Steele, Houston sophomore, lighting designer; Lane Davidson, Denton sophomore, sound designer; and TJ Davis, Beaumont junior, properties manager.

    Faculty production advisor is Inga Meier.

    Parker is a theatre major pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree. “The Boor” is her first directing credit, but she has worked as a scenic designer, choreographer, projections designer and paint charge on various SFA productions. After graduation, she hopes to pursue a master’s degree in directing.

    The Downstage Theatre is located in the Griffith Fine Arts Building, 2222 Alumni Drive.

    Tickets are $4. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.theatre.sfasu.edu.

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  • Three art exhibitions to open in Cole Art Center

    Three art exhibitions to open in Cole Art Center

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    “The Devil You Say! The Saintly, and Not So Saintly, in Folk Art” will show Oct. 24 through Jan. 16 in Reavley Gallery in The Cole Art Center @ The Old Opera House. Two other shows open the same night.

    October 23, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    Three art exhibitions will open with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 24, in The Cole Art Center @ The Old Opera House and will show through early January.

    “The Devil You Say! The Saintly, and Not So Saintly, in Folk Art” will show in Reavley Gallery through Jan. 16. Opening the same night are two other exhibitions, including “The Tenderness of Egocentrism: Drawings by Manuel Miranda” in the Reception Gallery and “25 Veinticinco: Mexican-American Prints from UT San Antonio” in Ledbetter Gallery, both of which run through Jan. 2.

    “The Devil You Say! The Saintly, and Not So Saintly, in Folk Art” is an exhibition that explores folk art and its relationship to religious and cultural traditions. Curated by Michael T. Ricker, the show features a variety of works, including paintings, printed matter, bottles with wooden sculpture inside and sculpture in various media, including pottery, wood, metal, shell, straw work, coconuts, bone, stone and cast iron.

    “The Tenderness of Egocentrism: Drawings by Manuel Miranda” features the pen and ink drawings of Mexican artist Miranda. Joseph M. Bravo curated the show. The artworks represent a series of archetypal characters that are a satire of the follies of the human condition, according to Bravo.

    “25 Veinticinco” is a suite of 25 prints by 25 Latino and Latina artists, and each print is signed, numbered and issued in a limited edition of 30. The images are printed on 22-inch by 30-inch archival paper and were produced using various techniques, including stone and aluminum plate lithography, etching and aquatint, linocut and screen-printing.

    The exhibitions are free and open to the public. They are sponsored in part by the SFA Friends of the Visual Arts and the Nacogdoches Junior Forum. The Cole Art Center is located at 329 E. Main St. For additional information, call (936) 468-1131.

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  • Meyer, Lloyd to perform solos with SFA Percussion Ensemble

    Meyer, Lloyd to perform solos with SFA Percussion Ensemble

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    October 23, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    Stephen F. Austin State University School of Music faculty members Dr. Brad Meyer and Keith Lloyd will perform solos when the SFA Percussion Ensemble presents a recital at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 4, in Cole Concert Hall on the SFA campus.

    Meyer, director of percussion studies at SFA and of the Percussion Ensemble, will play the steel pan on the premiere of Baljinder Singh Sekhon II’s “Passageways,” which utilizes the steel pan in new and different ways, including playing on the side and with wooden chopsticks.

    Lloyd will perform on “Shadow Chasers,” an exciting piece by Michael Burritt for marimba soloist with percussion trio that is now considered a standard of the percussion world.

    In “Passageways,” each section is a process-oriented progression of rhythm, pitch and timbre, according to its composer. The segments of this work can be heard as a string of transitions where each section serves as a passageway leading to the next.

    In describing his piece “Shadow Chasers,” Burritt wrote of C.S. Lewis and the English author’s referencing one’s time on earth as the “Shadow Lands.”

    “Many implications can be drawn from this metaphor,” Burritt wrote. “I have always considered myself, and most people, to be someone who chases after the thing of the Shadow Lands (a ‘Shadow Chaser’) rather than those of a higher calling. I too often look for rewards here instead of in my relationship with God. This is a battle I will constantly fight.”

    Other pieces on the program are “Cyclone” by Jim Casella, “Catching Shadows” by Ivan Trevino, “Escape Velocity” by Dave Hall and “From In Contact” by David Skidmore.

    Tickets for the recital are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and $3 for students and youth. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

    To learn more about the SFA Percussion Studio, visit/subscribe/”like” their online presence at:

    • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SFAPS

    • Website: http://www.Brad-Meyer.com/sfa

    • Twitter/Instagram/Vine/Tumbler/Pinterest: SFAPercStudio

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  • SFA’s Hachidori Duo to perform music of Ravel, O’Connor

    SFA’s Hachidori Duo to perform music of Ravel, O’Connor

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    October 23, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    Stephen F. Austin State University College of Fine Arts and School of Music will present the Hachidori Duo performing a faculty recital at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 1, in Cole Concert Hall of the Wright Music Building on the SFA campus.

    The Hachidori Duo includes music faculty members Dr. Jennifer Dalmas, violin, and Dr. Evgeni Raychev, cello. The husband-wife team will perform some of their favorite pieces from the duo repertoire for violin and cello they have discovered over the years.

    The program includes two pieces the couple played during their Oct. 16 performance in Carnegie Hall. The duo will perform Sonata for Violin and Cello by Maurice Ravel and “F.C.’s Jig” by Mark O’Connor.

    “The Ravel duo is probably the greatest duet ever written for this combination of instruments, and it is quite a change from Ravel’s typical style,” Dalmas said.

    F.C. stands for “Fiddle Concerto,” as the melody of this duet is taken from O’Connor’s well-known work.

    Other composers featured on the program will include Bohuslav Martinu and Johan Halvorsen.

    “Evgeni and I have been playing duo music since we met in Florida almost 20 years ago,” Dalmas said. “Although we have played for various events and have been featured performing a piece here and there, it has been quite a while since we have played an entire duo recital together.”

    Tickets to the recital are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and $3 for students and youth. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

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  • Guest artists Galaganov, Owings to perform at SFA

    Guest artists Galaganov, Owings to perform at SFA

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    Misha Galaganov
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    John Owings
    October 23, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The Stephen F. Austin State University College of Fine Arts and School of Music will present Dr. Misha Galaganov in a guest viola recital at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 1, in the Music Recital Hall in the Wright Music Building on the SFA campus.

    Galaganov, who is chair of strings and associate professor of viola at Texas Christian University, will be accompanied by colleague John Owings, professor of piano and piano division chair at TCU. The duo will perform “Music from the Library of Armand Pushman,” a program that features the works of Henri Marteau, Désuré Emile Inghelbrecht, Stan Golestan, Ernest Chausson and Joseph Jongen.

    “Besides Chausson, most of these composers are lesser known; I’m sure that there will be some wonderful gems of chamber music among them,” said Dr. Jennifer Dalmas, professor of violin at SFA.

    Referencing the program title, Dalmas explained that Pushman was one of two sons of the celebrated American-Armenian artist Hovsep Pushman. Armand and his brother were partners in Pushman & Company dealing in fine oriental rugs.

    “Armand was a talented musician, having studied the viola in Paris with Maurice Vieux in his youth in the 1920s. He enjoyed playing chamber music to his last years,” she said.

    Beginning at 4:30 p.m., Galaganov and Owings will give master classes that are free and open to the public. The piano class will be in Cole Concert Hall, and the viola class will be in the Music Recital Hall.

    At 2:30 p.m. that day, Dalmas and her husband, Dr. Evgeni Raychev, cello instructor in the SFA School of Music, will perform a recital as the Hachidori Duo in Cole Concert Hall.

    “With our duo concert that day, it will be a busy and exciting day for string students and string music enthusiasts at SFA,” Dalmas said.

    Galaganov’s solo and chamber music engagements have taken him to concert halls in the USA, Latin America, Europe and China. He has given lectures and master classes in major conservatories around the world, including Juilliard, Beijing Conservatory and Shanghai Conservatory. He has taught and performed in several European and American festivals, such as EuroArts Festival in Germany, Orlando Festival in Holland, and Mimir Festival in the USA.

    Owings holds the Herndon Professorship of Music at TCU. In 1993, the University conferred upon him its highest award, the Chancellor’s Award for Distinguished Research and Creative Activity, for his performances of the 32 Beethoven Sonatas. Owings has appeared as soloist with the symphony orchestras of Cleveland, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Fort Worth, Houston, the Boston Pops, the English Chamber Orchestra, and the National Symphony Orchestras of Colombia and Peru. He has performed recitals in major cities in the United States, Latin America, Europe and the Far East and has been a guest artist at numerous music festivals.

    Concert admission is free. For more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

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  • SFA voice faculty to perform works of composer Hoiby

    SFA voice faculty to perform works of composer Hoiby

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    Lee Hoiby
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    Jesse Givens
    October 21, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    Members of the voice faculty in the Stephen F. Austin State University School of Music, along with Ron Petti, SFA’s director of accompanying, will perform at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 30, in Cole Concert Hall on the SFA campus.

    The program, “Last Letter Home: The Songs of Lee Hoiby,” will feature works of the American composer and pianist who excelled in the genre of art song, according to Petti.

    “Many of Hoiby’s songs are widely performed throughout the world, in particular the ‘Songs for Leontyne,’ written for legendary soprano Leontyne Price, which will be performed on this concert,” Petti said.

    Scott LaGraff, professor of voice, will provide a short, informative talk about Hoiby and his work at the beginning of the concert.

    The feature piece on the concert will be the last work, entitled “Last Letter Home.” The text was taken from a letter written by U.S. Army Pfc. Jesse Givens to be delivered to his wife and family should he be killed in the line of duty, Petti explained. Givens drowned in the Euphrates River on May 1, 2003, in the service of his country. He had previously written a letter to his wife, Melissa, son, Dakota, nicknamed “Toad,” and his unborn child, Carson, nicknamed “Bean.” He asked Melissa not to open the envelope unless he was killed. “Please, only read it if I don’t come home,” he wrote. “Please put it away, and hopefully you will never have to read it.”

    “Three years later, Hoiby composed this song in honor of Jesse Givens,” Petti said.

    Melissa expressed her gratitude to Hoiby in a letter. She wrote in part: “I think Jesse would be so honored by what you are doing. He was an artist in many forms and he loved music so much. We have great pride in the man we loved and lost. I am deeply touched by what sharing his letter has done for others. It feels as though he is still touching the hearts of other people even after his death. My family will live forever with the great loss of Jesse; he was so much more than anyone I have ever met. I am proud that others choose to remember him in such ways as you are doing.”

    A PowerPoint presentation shown during the concert will feature photographs of Givens and his family.

    Tickets for this Cole Performing Arts Series recital are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and $3 for students and youth. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

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  • SFA’s A Cappella Choir to perform music of Bach

    SFA’s A Cappella Choir to perform music of Bach

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    SFA’s A Cappella Choir will perform at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 29, in Cole Concert Hall on the SFA campus.

    October 21, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The A Cappella Choir at Stephen F. Austin State University will present its fall concert at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 29, in Cole Concert Hall on the SFA campus.

    The performance will be the choir’s first concert at SFA after returning from a successful tour of Italy last May. The program will feature a wide variety of music from the 17th century to the 21st century, according to Tim King, director of choral activities for the SFA School of Music.

    Among the works to be performed is “Singet dem Herrn” (Sing to the Lord) by J.S. Bach.

    “Out of all the music – choral, keyboard, and orchestral music – that Bach composed, which is in excess of 1,110 works, he only composed six motets or anthems,” King said. “‘Singet dem Herrn’ is the most famous of the six and exhibits Bach’s mastery of composition and his devotion to music of the church.”

    The choir will also perform a set of two pieces by present day composers based on the subject of rain. “Aizej, Lietiņ” (Go Away Rain) by Ēriks Ešenvalds is based on Latvian folksong. The performance will feature Haley Brant, Katy junior, and Kjersten Sanders, Sugar Land junior, on harp with SFA music faculty member Christina Guenther on wooden flute. “Cloudburst” by American Eric Whitacre will be performed complete with storm sound effects, King said.

    The concert is a joint presentation of the College of Fine Arts and School of Music.

    Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and $3 for students and youth. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

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  • SFA’s Choral Union, Women’s Choir to perform program of sacred music

    SFA’s Choral Union, Women’s Choir to perform program of sacred music

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    Melissa Nabb

    October 16, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The Choral Union and Women’s Choir at Stephen F. Austin State University will perform a concert of sacred music at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 27, in Cole Concert Hall in the Wright Music Building on the SFA campus.

    The theme of the concert, “Sacred Journeys,” was chosen as a reflection of sacred music from all over the world and different time periods, according to Dr. Tod Fish, assistant professor and associate director of choral activities for the SFA School of Music.

    “The concert is representative of 12 different countries and drawn from music as early as the mid-15th century to works that are contemporary,” Fish said. “This is the most challenging and stylistically diverse program these choirs have performed during my tenure at SFA. It is going to be an exciting concert.”

    School of Music faculty member Melissa Nabb will serve as the viola soloist for Giacomo Puccini’s setting of “Requiem aeternam,” and guests from SFA’s orchestra program will also join in the performance.

    The Women’s Choir will sing a contemporary setting of “Cantate Domino” by Canadian composer Rupert Lang.

    “It incorporates the usage of an electronic keyboard instrument and aleatoric techniques from the choir,” Fish said, “as the choristers will sing the portions of the Latin text at their own tempo under a soloist. It is a most effective setting.”

    The women’s choir will also sing Guillaume Dufay’s “Ave Regina Caelorum,” an early Renaissance style piece that employs the usage of archaic techniques, such as the “Landini Cadence,” that does not lend itself to the modern ear, Fish explained.

    The Choral Union will sing “Himne” by Roelof Temmingh, who makes use of the 20th century compositional techniques of the octatonic scale and serialism, but does them in a way that makes the harmonic material seem functional, Fish said.

    “It is a fascinating piece, with a challenging accompaniment for Olga Wong, our accompanist,” he said.

    The Choral Union will also sing “Otche Nash” (The Lord’s Prayer) by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.

    “It is set in the style of chant used in the Russian Orthodox Church,” Fish said. “It is a lovely setting of great depth of tone and texture. The Choral Union will perform it in the original Church Slavonic.”

    Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and $3 for students and youth. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

    article ID 946

  • Work of composer Lias to be featured in New York City festival

    Work of composer Lias to be featured in New York City festival

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    Stephen Lias

    October 16, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The work of Stephen F. Austin State University School of Music faculty member Dr. Stephen Lias is featured in 60x60 Dance to be presented at the Winter Garden at Brookfield Place in New York City as part of the Vox Novus Festival.

    60x60 Dance features 60 one-minute audio pieces by different composers paired with 60 different dances creating a one-hour non-stop performance. Two performances, one at 12:30 p.m. and another at 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 23, make up part of the Vox Novus Festival, which is celebrating its 15 years of presenting and promoting new music.

    Lias is professor of composition at SFA. His one-minute work “Where Am I This Time?” is featured in this 60x60 mix. Dances will span all forms from ballet to hip-hop to ballroom and contemporary, while music includes neo-romantic, folk, tech-house, noise, rock and everything in-between.

    Primarily active in concert and chamber music, Lias’ activities as an adventurer-composer have led him to write more than a dozen pieces inspired by the national parks of the USA. He has served as artist-in-residence at Denali, Glacier, Rocky Mountain, Gates of the Arctic and Glacier Bay national parks, and the resulting pieces have been performed in such far-flung places as Alaska, Australia, Taiwan, Russia, and across the United States.

    Two different CDs of his chamber music were released last year, and he has been commissioned by the Boulder Philharmonic to write a new piece to be premiered in 2017 at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.

    article ID 945

  • ‘Songs and Life of Poldowski’ topic of lecture recital at SFA

    ‘Songs and Life of Poldowski’ topic of lecture recital at SFA

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    October 16, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    Soprano Dr. Sooah Park will present “Introduction to the Songs and Life of Poldowski” as part of the Stephen F. Austin State University School of Music’s Cole Performing Arts Series at 6 p.m. Friday, Oct. 23, in Cole Concert Hall on the SFA campus.

    This lecture recital will feature information on the life and works of Lady Poldowski, a Polish-British composer whose maiden name was Regine Wieniawska, followed by a performance of Poldowski’s songs and those of her more famous contemporaries, including Gabriel Fauré, Claude Debussy, Reynaldo Hahn, and Ernest Chausson, according to Scott LaGraff, professor of voice at SFA.

    Lady Poldowski was the youngest daughter of the celebrated violinist and composer Henryk Wieniawski. She composed 35 published songs, mostly settings of the poetry of Paul Verlaine.

    “Poldowski’s songs show the influence of the French school but are strongly original and individual expressions,” Park said. “This recital will present Poldowski's settings of Verlaine poems with those by Debussy, Fauré, Hahn and Chausson. Performing these songs will honor the legacy of many other women composers whose works have remained unperformed for many years.”

    An active opera performer, Park is a member of the voice faculty at UT Tyler. Her vocal talent was recognized at the 2007 Lois Alba Aria Competition where she was a finalist. She was also awarded honorable mention and 3rd prize for the National Association of Teachers of Singing Competition in 2005 and 2002. Houston Arts Week praised her Oscar from Verdi’s “Un Ballo in Maschera,” saying “Sooah Park shines as Oscar, and her singing is utterly delightful.”

    Dr. Gjergji Gaqi, music faculty member at Tyler Junior College, will accompany the artist. Equally at home in solo and collaborative music, Gaqi maintains an active performing career throughout North America and Europe. Together with his brother, accomplished pianist Piro Gaqi, through the Gaqi Piano Duo, they have brought the varied, folk-inspired piano duo repertoire of Europe and North America to audiences of both continents.

    Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and $3 for students and youth. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

    article ID 944

  • SFA to host ‘25 Veinticinco’ art exhibition

    SFA to host ‘25 Veinticinco’ art exhibition

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    Among the images in “25 Veinticinco: Mexican-American Prints from UT San Antonio” are works by Richard Duardo, Hecho en Aztlan, 2009; José Guadalupe Guadiana – Parade, 2008; Luis Jiménez – Cesar Chavez: An American Hero, 2008; Sam Coronado, Untitled, 2009.

    October 16, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    “25 Veinticinco: Mexican-American Prints from UT San Antonio,” will open with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 24, in The Cole Art Center @ The Old Opera House in downtown Nacogdoches.

    “25 Veinticinco” is a suite of 25 prints by 25 Latino and Latina artists, and each print is signed, numbered and issued in a limited edition of 30, according to John Handley, director of art galleries for Stephen F. Austin State University.

    The images are printed on 22-inch by 30-inch archival paper and were produced using various techniques, including stone and aluminum plate lithography, etching and aquatint, linocut and screen-printing, Handley said. The artists worked in collaboration with master printers Neal Cox, associate professor of art in SFA’s School of Art, and Steven Carter, who works in the print studio of The University of Texas at San Antonio’s Department of Art and Art History.

    “The common thread binding all of the work together is the cultural heritage shared by the artists,” Handley said.

    The most well known artist showing in the exhibition, Handley said, is the late Luis Jimenez, who died tragically halfway through the completion of his included work – a lithograph portrait of Cesar Chavez.

    Before coming to SFA to accept an appointment as a professor in the School of Art, Cox acted as the master printer for the UTSA Collaborative Editions program. His primary task involved the technical execution of the prints to be exhibited in collaboration with each artist. Cox accepted his appointment at SFA before completion of the print suite and had in mind to exhibit the prints at SFA when the project was finished, according to Handley.

    “25 Veinticinco” will show in Ledbetter Gallery. Opening the same night are two other exhibitions, including “The Devil You Say! The Saintly, and Not so Saintly, in Folk Art” in Reavley Gallery and “The Tenderness of Egocentrism: Drawings by Manuel Miranda” in the Reception Gallery. “25 Veinticinco” and the Miranda exhibitions run through Jan. 2, while “The Devil You Say!” exhibits through Jan. 16.

    The exhibitions are free and open to the public. They are sponsored in part by the SFA Friends of the Visual Arts and the Nacogdoches Junior Forum.

    The Cole Art Center is located at 329 E. Main St. For additional information, call (936) 468-1131.

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    article ID 943

  • Dalmas, Raychev to perform in Carnegie Hall

    Dalmas, Raychev to perform in Carnegie Hall

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    SFA music faculty members Jennifer Dalmas and Evgeni Raychev will perform in the InterHarmony International Music Festival Friday, Oct. 16, in Carnegie Hall.

    October 16, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    Two faculty members in the Stephen F. Austin State University School of Music will perform when the InterHarmony International Music Festival opens the fourth of its New York Concert Series Friday, Oct. 16, in Carnegie Hall.

    Dr. Jennifer Dalmas, associate professor of violin and viola, and her husband, Dr. Evgeni Raychev, cello instructor, will perform in the program “Between Worlds” at 8 p.m. Friday in the Weill Recital Hall, Carnegie Hall, New York.

    The InterHarmony International Music Festival has been bringing together students, teachers and soloists from around the globe for almost two decades. For the opening night of the IIMF’s fourth annual concert series, Music Director Misha Quint presents a program that celebrates music’s role as a universal ambassador.

    Dalmas and Raychev will present Maurice Ravel’s Sonata for Violin and Cello, described as one of the great examples of the duo form. A conversational drama develops between the low and high voice, in which the roles of lead and accompaniment intertwine seamlessly. “They discuss polyphonically, disagree sharply, even as to the key, seduce and reject each other, moving imperceptibly but inexorably towards reconciliation in the final chord,” according to the program notes. The duo will also perform Mark O’Connor’s “F.C’s Jig.” “F.C.” stands for “Fiddle Concerto,” as the melody of this duet is taken from O’Connor’s well-known work.

    The program also features Quint performing Dimitri Shostakovich’s Sonata in d minor for Violoncello and Piano, Op.40; violinist Yeon-Su Kim and Inga Kroll performing a selection of 10 of Luciano Berio’s Duetti per due violini; and pianist Washington Garcia performing Alberto Ginastera’s Piano Sonata No.1, Op.22.

    A member of the SFA music faculty since 2003, Dalmas has performed with the Tallahassee, Jacksonville, and New World symphonies, the Atlanta Baroque Orchestra and the Apollo Ensemble. She has served as concertmaster for the Orchestra of the Pines and performed with other regional symphonies. An avid chamber music player, she has been a member of both the Alazan Piano Trio and East Texas Baroque. She and Raychev perform together as the Hachidori Duo.

    Also a member of the SFA music faculty since 2003, Raychev is the founder of the Piney Woods Camerata, Piney Woods Youth Orchestra and a founding member of the Alazan Piano Trio. His newest endeavor is the foundation of the Cello Club in the fall of 2014, where cello enthusiasts of all ages are prepared online to gather together for a concert at SFA.

    article ID 942

  • SFA’s Wind Symphony, Symphonic Band to feature works by composer Turner

    SFA’s Wind Symphony, Symphonic Band to feature works by composer Turner

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    October 16, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The music of composer Jess Langston Turner will be performed in a concert of the Wind Symphony and Symphonic Band at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 20, in Turner Auditorium on the Stephen F. Austin State University campus.

    Directed by Dr. David W. Campo, associate director of bands at SFA, the Wind Symphony will feature guest soloist and SFA music faculty member Nita Hudson on Turner’s “Lullaby,” which is taken from a larger work for string orchestra and percussion, “Memorial to Silent Voices.” The text sung by the alto soloist is from the well-known traditional English lullaby, “All Through the Night.”

    “While the melody sung by the alto soloist is not the original, snatches of the traditional tune appear periodically in a solo flute,” explained Campo. “The simple melody and the gently rocking chordal accompaniment combine to form a peaceful and soothing lullaby.”

    The Symphonic Band, directed by Dr. Tamey Anglley, assistant director of bands, will open the concert with Turner’s “Oh, What A Morning,” which “depicts the dawn of a new morning, followed by rejoicing and an ecstatic celebration of eternal light,” according to Anglley.

    Graduate student Cheyenne Handorf of Palestine will conduct “The King of Love My Shepherd Is,” which Turner transcribed for band.

    “Originally composed by Dan Forrest for chorus, ‘The King of Love’ is an old Irish hymn tune with a lovely text by Henry W. Baker,” Anglley said.

    The third Turner piece will be “Noche Triste,” which is a depiction of “The Night of Sorrows,” an important event in the Spanish conquest of Mexico, according to Anglley. The Symphonic Band will finish its half of the concert with Fred Jewell’s “Quality Plus March.” Jewell is known as the “March King of Indiana,” which is where Turner is currently completing his doctoral degree.

    In addition to Turner’s “Lullaby,” the Wind Symphony will perform composer Kevin Walczyk’s “Sojourn of Dreams.” Walcyzk notes, “This work was commissioned to honor and celebrate the life of former band director Jeff Cumpston, who was tragically killed in Zimbabwe. The work’s melodic and harmonic constructs are derived from pitch structures based on Jeff’s name and folk elements indigenous to Zimbabwe. Prior to moving his family to Zimbabwe, Jeff was asked what made him decide to leave the comfortable environment of Oregon to go with his family and teach in Africa. Jeff’s answer was simple: ‘A dream.’ This work takes its title and inspiration from Jeff’s journey to fulfill a dream of service and commitment.”

    The final work by Wind Symphony will be Karl King’s stirring march “Invictus.”

    “This march was composed in 1921 and dedicated to Merle Evans, bandmaster of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus,” Campo said. “The march features technically challenging parts for the low brass along with sparkling woodwinds in the final strain.”

    Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and $3 for students and youth. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

    article ID 941

  • Pianist Crappell to perform works of famous Hungarian composers

    Pianist Crappell to perform works of famous Hungarian composers

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    October 16, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    Stephen F. Austin State University School of Music and the Cole Performing Arts Series will present pianist Courtney Crappell performing a recital at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 19, in Cole Concert Hall on the SFA campus.

    “Hungarian Recollections” is a program of solo piano music featuring works by two famous Hungarian composers, Béla Bartók and Franz Liszt, according to Mario Ajero, associate professor of piano pedagogy at SFA.

    “After beginning with the elegance, joy and naiveté found within Bartók’s settings of Hungarian children’s songs, the mood darkens and shifts towards spiritual awakening and Hungarian nationalism revealed in Liszt’s third ‘Années de pèlerinage’ (Years of Pilgrimage),” according to Crappell, who will also perform the Hungarian Rhapsody, No. 6.

    Crappell is associate professor of piano pedagogy in the Moores School of Music at the University of Houston. A native of south Louisiana, he earned his BM in piano performance at Louisiana State University and completed his MM and DMA degrees in piano performance and pedagogy at the University of Oklahoma.

    He is an award-winning published author and has served as an evaluator selected by the International Piano Performance Evaluations Committee in Taiwan. He remains active on the concert stage as a soloist and collaborative artist. During his graduate studies, he was a winner of the University of Oklahoma concerto competition.

    Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and $3 for students and youth. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

    article ID 940

  • PEN Trio to perform at SFA with special guest flutist Arnone

    PEN Trio to perform at SFA with special guest flutist Arnone

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    October 16, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The PEN Trio with special guest Francesca Arnone will present a program of 20th century music for woodwinds when they perform at 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 24, in Cole Concert Hall on the Stephen F. Austin State University campus.

    The PEN Trio includes Dr. Nora Lewis, oboe, Kansas State University; Dr. Phillip O. Paglialonga, clarinet, Virginia Tech University; and Dr. Eric Van der Veer Varner, bassoon, Lynn Conservatory. The name PEN Trio comes from the first letter of each person’s name – Phil, Eric and Nora.

    The trio is performing at SFA as part of the group’s Texas tour, which includes Baylor University, University of North Texas, Rice University and Texas A&M University-Commerce, according to Staci Spring, instructor of bassoon in the SFA School of Music.

    The program will include Divertimenti for flute, oboe, clarinet and bassoon by Frank Bridge; Quatuor for flute, oboe, clarinet and bassoon by Jean Francaix; Suite pour Trio D’Anches by Alexandre Tansman; and Cinq Pièces en Trio by Jacques Ibert.

    “The quartet for winds by Francaix is typical of the composer’s humorous and quirky style,” Spring said. “Light, somewhat airy melodies hide deceptively difficult ensemble playing and passage work. This is one of his more popular works, and it is always an audience favorite.

    “Ibert’s Cinq Pièces en Trio includes five short, charming movements, and is one of 11 pieces dedicated to the original Paris Reed Trio in the 1930s,” she added. “The group was responsible for establishing much of the standard reed trio repertoire and is part of the inspiration behind the formation of the PEN Trio.”

    Special guest Arnone, assistant professor of flute at Baylor University, will perform on the Bridge and the Francaix pieces.

    The PEN Trio bridges performance and scholarship to explore and expand the repertoire for the traditional trio d’anches, or “reed trio.” The ensemble regularly tours throughout North America and abroad. The trio has visited dozens of universities and has performed at numerous academic conferences, chamber music series and private functions. Their 2015 season includes performances in China, Hong Kong and Trinidad as well as tours in Florida and Texas.

    Arnone has more than 20 years of regional orchestral experience performing in the United States and Mexico, including serving as principal flute of the Boise Philharmonic and the Waco Symphony.

    “This is a wonderful opportunity for our students and the music community to hear exceptional artistry,” Spring said.

    The group members will also present master classes on Saturday morning.

    Tickets to the recital are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and $3 for students and youth. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

    article ID 939

  • Dean’s Circle recognizes award recipients

    Dean’s Circle recognizes award recipients

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    Sponsors of this year’s Winners’ Circle reception included, from left, Ron Johnson, CBH Insurance Agency and Nacogdoches Film Festival; Chris Sidnell; Gary Stokes, Nacogdoches Medical Center; Susie Patterson, Cal-Tex Lumber Company; Dr. A.C. “Buddy” Himes, dean, College of Fine Arts: Tom Boggs of Old Souls Food Truck and Jackie Boggs, Aaron Diggens and Misty Boggs. Not pictured are Cecil and Gloria Settle, Jimmy Mize, First Bank & Trust of East Texas; Scott Street, Nacogdoches Memorial Health; Scott Diggs, Grogan’s Cleaners; Jason Sobel, Regions Bank; and Bill Sherrod, Flashback Café.

    October 16, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    Members of the Stephen F. Austin State University College of Fine Arts Dean’s Circle recently recognized its 2015 award recipients at the annual Winners’ Circle reception held in the home of Bo and Melanie Miller.

    This year’s recipients, who were announced and honored in April, were re-introduced at the reception. Recipients included Megan Eve Henderson, Round Rock art major, recipient of the Ed and Gwen Cole Dean’s Award in Art; Amanda J. Sheriff, Houston music education major, recipient of the Jack and Naioma Ledbetter Dean’s Award in Music; Kaylea A. Fleming, Kingwood music education major, recipient of the Dr. Robert Sidnell Memorial Dean’s Award in Music Education; and Shelby K. Gilliland, Frisco theatre major, recipient of the George and Peggy Schmidbauer Dean’s Award in Theatre.

    Each recipient was selected by the faculty of their respective schools on the basis of their potential to further develop their artistic goals and serve as role models, according to Dr. A.C. “Buddy” Himes, dean of the College of Fine Arts.

    The Dean’s Awards not only recognize the recipients for what they have already accomplished, but the awards are also designed to inspire them to reach deep from within to aspire to a higher level of excellence, Himes explained. The awards were established by the Dean’s Circle, an external support organization of community members founded in 2008 and “dedicated, in part, to nurturing potential young artists within the College of Fine Arts,” Himes said.

    Program sponsors were recognized at the event. Those included Cal-Tex Lumber Company, Nacogdoches Medical Center, Cecil and Gloria Settle, First Bank & Trust of East Texas, Flashback Café, Nacogdoches Memorial Health, The Sidnell Family, CBH Insurance Agency, Grogan’s Cleaners, Nacogdoches Film Festival, Regions Bank, Old Souls Food Truck and auctioneer Kent Crank.

    The annual fall event serves as a membership drive and fundraiser for the Dean’s Circle. In addition to recognizing the accomplishments of students, the Dean’s Circle is also focused on enhancing instructional opportunities for fine arts faculty. The Dean’s Circle realized the College of Fine Arts’ first ever endowed professorship this year, and its recipient will be announced in the spring.

    article ID 938

  • Works by Mexican artist Miranda to show at Cole Art Center

    Works by Mexican artist Miranda to show at Cole Art Center

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    October 14, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The pen and ink drawings of Mexican artist Manuel Miranda will be featured in an exhibition that opens Saturday, Oct. 24, in the Reception Gallery in The Cole Art Center @ The Old Opera House in downtown Nacogdoches.

    “The Tenderness of Egocentrism: Drawings by Manuel Miranda” opens with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Joseph M. Bravo curated the show.

    “These pen and ink drawings reflect a discrete body of work within the artist’s oeuvre,” writes Bravo. “These artworks represent a series of archetypal characters that are a satire of the follies of the human condition. Dancers, butterfly catchers, jugglers, performers and other eccentrics are examined as an exploration of the diversity of the human experience and the fracturing of caricatured identities that imply the risk of madness.

    “The figures are both the observers and the observed, self aware yet delusional, conflicted in their identities and their relationships to each other,” Bravo continues. “They examine the dualistic nature of humanity and its inherent contradictions between egocentrism and social engagement. They function as an emotional X-ray rendered in an intuitive style that reflects the immediacy of unfiltered gesture produced through noncognitive automatism.”

    “The Tenderness of Egocentrism: Drawings by Manuel Miranda” shows through Jan. 2. Opening the same night are two other exhibitions. “The Devil You Say! The Saintly, and Not So Saintly, in Folk Art” will show in Reavley Gallery through Jan. 16, and “25 Veinticinco: Mexican-American Prints from UT San Antonio” will show in Ledbetter Gallery through Jan. 2.

    The exhibitions are free and open to the public. They are sponsored in part by the SFA Friends of the Visual Arts and the Nacogdoches Junior Forum.

    The Cole Art Center is located at 329 E. Main St. For additional information, call (936) 468-1131.

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    article ID 937

  • Exhibition explores folk art’s relationship to religious, cultural traditions

    Exhibition explores folk art’s relationship to religious, cultural traditions

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    “The Devil You Say! The Saintly, and Not So Saintly, in Folk Art” will show Oct. 24 through Jan. 16 in Reavley Gallery in The Cole Art Center @ The Old Opera House.

    October 14, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    “The Devil You Say! The Saintly, and Not So Saintly, in Folk Art,” an exhibition that explores folk art and its relationship to religious and cultural traditions, will open with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 24, in The Cole Art Center @ The Old Opera House in downtown Nacogdoches.

    The exhibition, curated by Michael T. Ricker, features a variety of works, including paintings, printed matter, bottles with wooden sculpture inside and sculpture in various media, including pottery, wood, metal, shell, straw work, coconuts, bone, stone and cast iron.

    “Although some of the work is quite serious in nature, there are also examples that are playful and poke fun with a sense of humor,” said John Handley, director of art galleries for Stephen F. Austin State University. “Many items in this exhibition are rarely displayed outside of private collections, including early examples that date from the late 18th and 19th centuries.

    “All works can be understood to some degree as religious in nature, from depictions of the crucifixion and saints to those of mythical devils and characters,” he added.

    In the introduction to the catalogue for the exhibition, Handley explains that for centuries “people have been fascinated with the depiction of holy individuals, as well as monsters and devils, pitting the longing for piety and morality against a pantheon of temptations and evildoers.”

    Handley goes on to write: “Christian icons as early as the 7th century show little devils pulling saints from a ladder as they strive to ascend heavenward. Such notable artists as Hieronymus Bosch and Michelangelo devised nightmarish scenes of hell where the condemned are in a state of constant torment, while in other scenes the saintly live on in bliss. ‘The Devil You Say!’ explores this rich iconography through the world of folk art, most of which was made by unknown craftsmen.”

    “The Devil You Say! The Saintly, and Not So Saintly, in Folk Art” will show in Reavley Gallery through Jan. 16. Opening the same night are two other exhibitions, including “The Tenderness of Egocentrism: Drawings by Manuel Miranda” in the Reception Gallery and “25 Veinticinco: Mexican-American Prints from UT San Antonio” in Ledbetter Gallery, both of which run through Jan. 2.

    The exhibitions are free and open to the public. They are sponsored in part by the SFA Friends of the Visual Arts and the Nacogdoches Junior Forum.

    The Cole Art Center is located at 329 E. Main St. For additional information, call (936) 468-1131.

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    article ID 936

  • University Series to present The Hot Club of San Francisco

    University Series to present The Hot Club of San Francisco

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    The 2015-2016 University Series presented by the SFA College of Fine Arts will feature The Hot Club of San Francisco performing at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 22, in W.M. Turner Auditorium on the SFA campus.

    October 9, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The College of Fine Arts at Stephen F. Austin State University will present The Hot Club of San Francisco at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 22, in W.M. Turner Auditorium on the SFA campus as part of the 2015-2016 University Series.

    An evening of vintage silent films accompanied by live gypsy swing will hit Turner stage when The Hot Club of San Francisco presents “Cinema Vivant,” a celebration of imagination and innovation. Like the wandering gypsy musicians of the 1930s, these artists play their guitars and fiddles while matching movements on the screen with characteristic virtuosity, passion and humor, according to Dr. John Goodall, associate dean for the College of Fine Arts.

    “These superb, multi-talented musicians will impress our Nacogdoches audience not only for their mastery of multiple instruments, but also for the excitement they bring to the Turner stage,” Goodall said. “It’s going to be an extraordinary night of music and fun.”

    Prior to the performance, Herbert Midgley, instructor in the SFA School of Music, will present a 7 p.m. informative talk in Griffith Gallery about the upcoming performance. The gallery is located across the hall from Turner Auditorium, which is located in the Griffith Fine Arts Building, 2222 Alumni Drive.

    The audience is invited back to the gallery for a post-performance reception to meet the performers and to honor the event’s corporate sponsor, BancorpSouth.

    Single event ticket prices are $25 for adults, $20 for seniors and $10 for students/youth. For tickets or more information, visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu or call the Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or (888) 240-ARTS.

    SFA students may purchase Rush tickets for $3 during regular office hours starting Monday, Oct. 19. Students must present a valid SFA ID for purchase and at the door on event night.

    For more information on the 2015-2016 University Series, visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

    article ID 935

  • Andrew exhibition showing at Arkansas university

    Andrew exhibition showing at Arkansas university

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    October 8, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    An exhibition of the artwork of Peter Andrew, graphic design professor in the Stephen F. Austin State University School of Art, is currently showing at Southern Arkansas University. Tropical Water Colors is exhibited Oct. 5 through 30 at Brinson Fine Art Gallery, 100 E. University, Magnolia, Arkansas. Andrew’s professional experience includes 12 years of art direction in advertising, publishing and freelance work as a design software trainer for the printing industry. He is an artist member of the New York Society of Illustrators and an artist consultant in the artists’ materials industry. His art is also currently represented by galleries in Corpus Christi and Houston, Texas, and in Salt Lake City, Utah, and on the Internet at http://www.peterandrew.net.

    article ID 934

  • Selden’s work featured in esteemed publication

    Selden’s work featured in esteemed publication

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    Lauren Selden
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    Similar Discussion by Lauren Selden
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    Engagement by Lauren Selden
    October 8, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The work of Lauren B. Selden, associate professor of metal/jewelry in the School of Art at Stephen F. Austin State University, was recently published in Metalsmith, a well-known publication of contemporary metalworking and jewelry.

    The quarterly magazine is released by the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG), the metalworking and jewelry international organization. SNAG described “Moved by Metal: On Beauty as Interaction” as “a showcase of works that help us discover beauty in the process of engagement.”

    “Being featured in this ‘Exhibition in Print’ is one of the highlights of my career,” Selden said. “I am so honored to be part of the publication as well as the traveling exhibition.”

    The exhibition was on display at the Center for Craft Creativity and Design in Asheville, North Carolina, accompanying the “Spaces of Production” project this past summer from July 31through Aug. 22.

    The “Moved by Metal” selection was curated by author Wendy Steiner, whose books include “Venus in Exile: The Rejection of Beauty in Twentieth-Century Art” and “The Scandal of Pleasure: Art in an Age of Fundamentalism.” Steiner’s essay for this issue reveals how beauty is not inherent in things, or even in the eye of the beholder, but instead lies in the interchange between objects and viewers, according to the article.

    “While all of the featured works invite interaction or empathy, they do not all follow the same template for beauty. This issue includes a diverse range of forms and styles, from functional objects to public installations to toys and puzzles. Regardless of their format or scale, each piece has the capacity to move us in some way and to remind us of beauty’s undeniable power,” the article said.

    “This publication is the source for knowing the contemporary movements of our diverse field,” Selden said. “In the publication, you will see things ranging from wearable jewelry, art jewelry, sculpture, environmental works, installation and more. Also, the magazine highlights a wide variety of processes and materials that artists today are utilizing to make their work.”

    Metalsmith Magazine and SNAG are main resources for Selden’s students as they learn contemporary metalworking and jewelry. Each quarter, the students review the magazine and find inspiration. Many SFA art students are members of SNAG and are becoming more involved in the organization, Selden said.

    “When we travel to other conferences and workshops, the communities are linked together, and the knowledge of the makers in our field make it easier to network and find future opportunities,” she said. “I hope that my recent publication gives them the drive they need to continue working and becoming active in the field. If I can lead by example, I expect their possibilities can open further. If I expect the world from them and the highest level of quality, they should expect the same from me and know that I’m continuing to strive to stay current and relevant in our field.”

    Selden said the manner in which her work was utilized in the publication may, perhaps, be the greatest honor. Steiner, professor, author and founding director of the Penn Humanities Forum, has written multiple impressive works that discuss beauty in the 21st century.

    “My favorite thing about the way they utilized my work in this publication is that they referenced the work in three different locations, under three different subjects, from three very different times in my career,” she said. “I am so grateful that they selected work that spanned from 2007 to the present. I was featured in a section about ‘yearning for connection,’ ‘visualizing interaction,’ and ‘games, toys, playgrounds.’ This diversity of context truly has given me the encouragement that I need in a time where I am questioning the variety of concepts that I employ.”

    Selden received her BFA from Murray State University in Murray, Kentucky, and her MFA from Arizona State University. Exhibition accomplishments include solo exhibitions across Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Louisiana and Kentucky. Her work has appeared in juried and invitational exhibitions nationally and internationally. Selden’s outdoor sculptures are currently on exhibition at the Abilene Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition, the Wichita Falls Kemp Center for the Arts Art on the Green Exhibition, and the Palestine Art Track Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition.

    article ID 933

  • Various Middle Eastern cultures reflected in “The Arabian Nights”

    Various Middle Eastern cultures reflected in “The Arabian Nights”

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    Attention to differences in Middle Eastern cultures is apparent in costume, hair and makeup designs in the SFA School of Theatre’s production of Mary Zimmerman’s “The Arabian Nights,” showing at 7:30 nightly through Saturday, Oct. 10, in Turner Auditorium on the SFA campus.

    October 7, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    Cast and production staff members of “The Arabian Nights,” the Stephen F. Austin State University School of Theatre’s current Mainstage Series play adapted from “The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night,” have learned a lot about the Far East, the Indian subcontinent, the Middle East and North Africa.

    In the weeks leading up to the play’s Oct. 6 opening before enthusiastic crowds, students and their teachers explored cultures with which many were unfamiliar. But theatre professor Angela Bacarisse, who designed costumes, hair and make-up for the play, and her hair and make-up assistant designer, student Samantha Friedrich, each brought unique insights to the production.

    As a freshman student at the University of Delaware, Bacarisse’s assigned roommate was from Saudi Arabia, and through that new friendship with Farida, Bacarisse got her first “real taste” of Middle Eastern culture. But midway through that first semester, Bacarisse returned from class one day to the dorm room they shared to find Farida’s father, who was an economics professor at another university in Pennsylvania, had packed his daughter’s belongings and was taking her home.

    “He had decided unmarried women should not live away from their fathers, and he took her home,” Bacarisse said. “That was kind of shocking to me. That’s when I decided I needed to know more about this culture.”

    The incident started Bacarisse reading about and researching the culture. When the first Gulf War broke out, Bacarisse had just started her first teaching job. The war made her want to learn even more about the Middle East so she could better explain the daily news events to her students. She also read a series of books by author Jean Sasson about the life of a Saudi princess and how women of the Middle East are treated within their countries and their own homes.

    “It was eye-opening to understand the difference between someone who believes in their faith and the good things about it,” Bacarisse said, “and doesn’t believe in the people who are trying to kill those who don’t have their faith.”

    Deeper reading about women like Gertrude Bell and Freya Stark, who traveled extensively throughout the Middle East and wrote about their experiences, gave her greater insight into the history of the Middle East and how the countries were shaped and divided without taking into consideration the impact dividing various religions would have.

    “I developed this fascination with the culture and women’s studies,” Bacarisse said. “There is a lot of reverence for women as opposed to hatred for women in the culture that I don’t think a lot of people realize. Part of keeping women separate is so that others don’t ‘steal’ them. So some of the thinking is ancient, but what they do is based on reverence.”

    At one point during the mid-1980s, Bacarisse worked in an exclusive clothing store in Detroit where she was the only American in the workroom. Every other employee was from Iran. Bacarisse listened to the women tell their stories of escape “with only the clothes on their backs.”

    “These were wealthy women who left it all to break away from the ayatollah,” she said.

    Bacarisse and Friedrich have had many long conversations about the Middle East. As an American female growing up in the Middle East because of her father’s job in the oil industry, Friedrich had to, at times, “behave in a certain way” outside the home.

    Born in Texas but moving to Dubai when she was 4, Friedrich, a self-described “oil brat,” spent most of her early educational years in Abu Dhabi and Saudi Arabia.

    “Through living overseas, we were able to travel a lot and experience a lot of different cultures,” she said. “I would love to live back overseas. The culture is so beautiful with so much loyalty and devotion to religion.”

    Friedrich plans to use her travels and experiences in the Middle East to create “a melting pot of cultures” for “The Arabian Nights.”

    SFA’s production of Mary Zimmerman’s “The Arabian Nights” will not be specific to one Middle Eastern culture, Bacarisse said. Rather, the play will portray and the costumes will reflect many cultures of the region. A donation of Middle Eastern clothing several years ago provides the costume backdrop for the play.

    “If you do the research, you’ll find that Kurdish women dress differently than Saudi Arabian women, and they dress differently than women in Yemen and women in Palestine,” she said. “Since the stories in this play take place all over the Middle East and North Africa, we’re not being specific. There is a sort of romanticized version of what the Middle East looks like, and it’s very biblical. These are the clothes you would see in your Christmas pageant in church. But we’re also pulling in the look from Disney’s ‘Aladdin.’”

    “I want to represent the beauty the women and men have, and I want to translate that into the hair and make-up design,” Friedrich said. “I loved and cherished my life there, and I want the people to be represented in a loving way.”

    The School of Theatre presents “The Arabian Nights” at 7:30 nightly through Saturday, Oct. 10, in W.M. Turner Auditorium on the SFA campus. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for seniors and $7.50 for students. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit theatre.sfasu.edu.

    The Mainstage Series is sponsored in part by Tipton Ford Lincoln.

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    article ID 932

  • SFA Wind Ensemble to present “Legends” program

    SFA Wind Ensemble to present “Legends” program

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    Jess Turner
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    Staci Spring
    October 6, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The Wind Ensemble at Stephen F. Austin State University will present “Legends” at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 13, in W.M. Turner Auditorium in the Griffith Fine Arts Building on the SFA campus.

    “We have three featured performers on this concert,” said Fred J. Allen, director of bands.

    Staci Spring, bassoon instructor in the School of Music, will perform as soloist on Dana Wilson’s “The Avatar,” a concerto for bassoon and chamber ensemble.

    “This music has an Indian flavor to it,” Allen said.

    Composer Jess Langston Turner will be present for the performance of his work “Rumpelstilzchen.”

    “Turner is an award-winning composer, writing for band, orchestra and voices,” Allen said. “His ‘Rumpelstilzchen’ uses music to tell the familiar fairytale of the miserly gnome who could spin straw into gold.”

    SFA alumnus Larry Ward, ’74 and ’76, will guest conduct John Philip Sousa’s “George Washington Bicentennial March.” Ward is being honored as the 2015 inductee into the SFA Band Directors Hall of Fame, a project of the SFA chapter of Kappa Kappa Psi, national honorary band fraternity.

    “Ward retired this year after a successful career as a band director,” Allen said. “He was most recently the director at Atascocita High School. His bands were outstanding there, as were his bands in Athens, Kingwood, Lufkin and the other places he taught.”

    The concert also includes pieces by the American composers Howard Hanson and Joseph Turrin.

    The concert is a presentation of the SFA College of Fine Arts and School of Music. Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and $3 for students and youth. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

    article ID 931

  • SFA’s children’s series to present “Fly Guy and Other Stories”

    SFA’s children’s series to present “Fly Guy and Other Stories”

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    “Fly Guy & Other Stories” will be presented at 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 16, in Turner Auditorium on the SFA campus.

    October 6, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The Children’s Performing Arts Series at Stephen F. Austin State University opens its 2015-2016 season by presenting Theatreworks USA’s “Fly Guy & Other Stories” in two performances Friday, Oct. 16, in W.M. Turner Auditorium on the SFA campus.

    Seven delightful stories come to life in this hour-long musical revue based on popular children’s books, including “Fly Guy Meets Fly Girl,” “Diary of a Worm,” “Fluffy the Classroom Guinea Pig,” “Horace & Morris but Mostly Dolores,” “Kitten’s First Full Moon,” “Lilly’s Big Day” and “Paper Bag Princess,” according to Diane Peterson, manager of the SFA Fine Arts Box Office and director of the series.

    “Performed by a multi-racial cast, the stories represent various issues, themes and ideas relevant to a broad and diverse audience of children,” Peterson said.

    “Fly Guy & Other Stories” targets children in pre-kindergarten through fifth grades. Stories in the production are subject to change.

    Performances are at 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Tickets are $7.50 for individuals and $6 per person for groups of 20 or more.

    To order tickets, call 936.468.6407 or 888.240.ARTS. Visit the CPAS website at http://www.cpas.sfasu.edu for additional information.

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    article ID 930

  • Nakasone exhibition features the art of ‘sho’

    Nakasone exhibition features the art of ‘sho’

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    The image ryū (dragon) is part of an exhibition, “Ron Y. Nakasone: Formless Form, the Art of Sho,” that will show in Griffith Gallery Oct. 15 through Nov. 20.

    October 6, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The exhibition “Ron Y. Nakasone: Formless Form, the Art of Sho” will open with a reception at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 15, in Griffith Gallery on the campus of Stephen F. Austin State University.

    The exhibition features the modern expression of a traditional art form that is still highly respected in East Asia. The art of “sho” and its metaphysical support, Buddhist thought, especially that of Zen, had a great impact on Western art in the later half of the last century, according to John Handley, director of SFA art galleries.

    Nakasone states that “the Art of Sho (calligraphy) uses the soft (Chinese) brush, free flowing ink, and absorbent paper to give form to the artist-writer’s being, feelings and thoughts. The art is an opportunity for the sho-artist to give form through line and space to his or her spiritual landscape.”

    During the late 1940s and early 1950s, sho artists, intent on revitalizing their tradition, saw a commonality with the non-representative subject matter of modern art and the spontaneity of the creative process in the action paintings exemplified by Jackson Pollack. Many Western artists felt a kinship with the expressive spontaneity of Zenga (Zen paintings) and Zen-inspired sho.

    “This affinity resulted in a number of exhibitions that highlighted the expressive possibilities of the brush to mirror the inner life of the artist,” Nakasone said.

    While the more subtle technical aspects of and aesthetic qualities created by the soft brush may be difficult to discern, audiences beyond East Asia can appreciate the expressive movement of line and vitality of space, he said.

    Among the comments from the guest book at Nakasone’s show last fall at the Graduate Theological Union, Berkley, California: “These are so beautiful...have opened my eyes to a new kind of artistic expression of humanity.” Cindy Pinus, GTU student.

    The exhibition is presented by the SFA School of Art and is sponsored in part by the Friends of the Visual Arts and Nacogdoches Junior Forum. Griffith Gallery is located in the Griffith Fine Arts Building, 2222 Alumni Drive. The show runs through Nov. 20. For additional information, call (936) 468-1131.

    Nakasone will present a public lecture and demonstration at the Cole Art Center @ The Old Opera House at 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 17. The lecture is free.

    article ID 929

  • SFA theatre students to present ‘Five Women Wearing the Same Dress’

    SFA theatre students to present ‘Five Women Wearing the Same Dress’

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    October 6, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    Stephen F. Austin State University School of Theatre will present the student-directed “Five Women Wearing the Same Dress” at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 16, and at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 17, in the Downstage Theatre on the SFA campus.

    Fairfield senior Eric Gibson directs Alan Ball’s comedy about a newly married couple’s overdone wedding reception.

    “During an ostentatious wedding reception at a Knoxville, Tennessee, estate, five reluctant, identically clad bridesmaids hide out in an upstairs bedroom, each with her own reason to avoid the proceedings below,” Gibson said in describing the play. “As the afternoon wears on, these five very different women joyously discover a common bond in a wickedly funny, irreverent and touching celebration of the women’s spirit.”

    The cast includes New Boston senior Tori Bean as Frances; Frisco senior Shelby Gilliland as Meredith; Dallas senior Jonee Lewis as Trisha; Beaumont junior Angel Williams as Georgeanne; Port Neches senior Marley Graham as Mindy; and Carthage junior Zach Barlow as Tripp.

    The production staff includes Brooke McPherson, Leander junior, stage manager; Jason Trevino, Houston sophomore, scenic designer; T.J. Davis, Beaumont junior, costume designer; K.C. Counts, Gladewater senior, lighting designer; Devin Bruton, Nacogdoches junior, sound designer; Tevia Loeser, Spring sophomore, props designer; Jessica Benson, Austin sophomore, hair and makeup designer.

    Faculty production advisor is Zach Hanks.

    Gibson is a theatre major who will graduate in December, after which he plans to pursue a film-stage career in Dallas. As an SFA student, he directed “The Patient” and “Manhattan Drum Taps” and was assistant director for “Alice In Wonderland” and “Bad Dates.” He has performed in “Loyalties,” “To Kill a Mockingbird,” “W;t,” “Woman and Scarecrow” and “The Valiant.” He was also a member of The Fredonia Players.

    The Downstage Theatre is located in the Griffith Fine Arts Building, 2222 Alumni Drive.

    Tickets are $6. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.theatre.sfasu.edu.

    article ID 928

  • SFA School of Art to host graphic design conference

    SFA School of Art to host graphic design conference

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    Kaitlyn Porterfield
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    Whitney Kelley
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    Andy Cummings
    October 5, 2015—Robbie Goodrich

    The Stephen F. Austin State University School of Art will present a graphic design conference Thursday and Friday. Oct. 15 and 16, featuring visiting SFA alumni who work professionally in the design arts.

    The conference is intended for interested SFA students studying art, communication, marketing and related fields, SFA faculty and staff, as well as regional and junior college instructors, high school art students and teachers, and design professionals in all areas of marketing, advertising and public relations.

    “The conference will provide networking opportunities for design-interested persons,” said Peter Andrew, graphic design professor in the SFA School of Art, “and it will showcase SFA’s graphic design program to interested and incoming students.”

    Guest designer presentations will be made from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday in Room B121 of the Art Building on Wilson Drive on the SFA campus. Alumni presenters include Kaitlyn Porterfield, creative director for Tyler Today magazine; Whitney Kelley, art director, Freed Advertising, Houston; and Andy Cummings, senior graphic and web designer, Excentus Corporation, Dallas. The presentations will include a question-answer session, followed by dinner.

    Friday’s session will include a roundtable design discussion with the presenters and students from 10 a.m. to noon at The Cole Art Center @ The Old Opera House, 329 E. Main St. in downtown Nacogdoches. The session will be followed by lunch, followed by student portfolio reviews by the alumni designers.

    The conference is co-sponsored by the newly formed AIGA-SFA. Founded in 1914 as the American Institute of Graphic Arts, AIGA is now known simply as AIGA, the professional association for design, according to information at aiga.org.

    The conference is free and open to the public. However, those interested in attending may sign up by calling the School of Art office at (936) 468-4804.

    article ID 927

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